McConnell introduces bill tying $2K stimulus checks to Section 230 repeal

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), has thrown a wrench into the expected Congressional over-ride of President Trump's veto of the National Defense Authorization Act.

Enlarge / Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), has thrown a wrench into the expected Congressional over-ride of President Trump’s veto of the National Defense Authorization Act. (credit: Ting Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has thrown a wrench into Congressional approval of an increase in government stimulus relief checks from $600 to $2,000. The House voted overwhelmingly on Monday to increase the payments, as President Trump had advocated for. Instead of voting on the House bill, however, McConnell blocked it and instead introduced a new bill tying higher stimulus payments to Section 230’s full repeal, according to Verge, which obtained a copy of the bill’s text.

It’s a tangled web, but the move is tied to Trump’s veto of the National Defense Authorization Act, which authorizes $740 billion in defense spending for the upcoming government fiscal year. “No one has worked harder, or approved more money for the military, than I have,” Trump said in a statement about the veto, claiming falsely that the military “was totally depleted” when he took office in 2017. “Your failure to terminate the very dangerous national security risk of Section 230 will make our intelligence virtually impossible to conduct without everyone knowing what we are doing at every step.”

Section 230 has nothing to do with military intelligence; it’s a 1996 law designed to protect Internet platforms. At its highest level, the short snippet of law basically does two things. First, it grants Internet service providers, including online platforms, broad immunity from being held legally liable for content third-party users share. Second, it grants those same services legal immunity from the decisions they make around content moderation—no matter how much or how little they choose to do.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments